Short-Term Reuse Targets


architectural salvave

© Svetlana Tikhonova | Dreamstime Stock Photos

WAREHOUSING  is a quick and easily implemented interim use for Rawleigh’s large open spaces. The buildings’ solid concrete and steel construction, high ceilings, open floors, loading docks and freight elevators all lend themselves to storage and flex space. With minimum and low cost improvements, Buildings B and D can provide highly functional and cost-effective storage space, which can be easily expanded to other floors as may be required by a growing business.

WHAT’S NEXT?

  • The City has negotiated the sale of Building D, the southeastern most building in the Rawleigh complex, to a local private party who has secured initial tenants for the first two floors and can make the upper four floors immediately available for a wide range of uses including warehousing.  The building is served by three covered loading docks and has a functional freight elevator.
  • The City is currently seeking short and long term uses for Building B and following a plan for a floor-by-floor reoccupation of the building as tenants are identified.  Each floor has a net leasable area of approximately 11,500 sq. ft. that can be divided into individual tenant spaces of approximately 500 sq. ft. to 8,000 sq. ft.  The building has a freight elevator and will be equipped with a raised loading dock off of the alley to the north.

ARCHITECTURAL SALVAGE AND ANTIQUE SALES require minimal improvements and can take advantage of Rawleigh’s open floors and high ceilings.  Architectural salvage refers to the reselling of building material reclaimed from the deconstruction of homes and other buildings. This material is often sold at a discount and provides a range of period architectural pieces that appeal to collectors, and add unique character to custom homes and do-it-yourself projects. Television shows like “West End Salvage,” and “Salvage Dawgs” offer insight into this industry and demonstrate its growing popularity. Likewise, an antique mall may provide low-cost, shared space for multiple vendors to store and display their inventory.  Galena is a renowned destination for history buffs and antique collectors, and Freeport is on the primary route used to reach Galena from Chicago.

WHY TARGET SPACE FOR ARCHITECTURAL SALVAGE?

  • Architectural salvage is a popular draw for tourists, collectors, and contractors. Architectural Salvage attracts people who are often willing to travel for miles in search of a particular style of antique doors, vintage lighting fixtures, affordable window glass, or other goods that would offer their home unique character.
  • Rawleigh’s sturdy construction, open floors, high ceilings and extensive natural light allow materials of all types to be stored and displayed in a manner that allows for easy browsing.
  • Having a facility to capture local and regional architectural history and give building components and furniture new life is increasingly relevant to Freeport, a shrinking city like many old manufacturing towns, looking to rehabilitate and right- size its own housing stock.
  • Nonprofits like the Habitat for Humanity operate ReStores which generate significant funds through the resale of donated building materials and fixtures.

WHAT’S NEXT?

  • The City has negotiated the sale of Building D, the southeastern most building in the Rawleigh complex, to a local private party who has secured initial tenants for the first two floors making the upper four floors immediately available for a wide range of uses including architectural salvage and antique sales.  The building is served by three covered loading docks and has a functional freight elevator.
  • The City is currently seeking short and long term uses for Building B and following a plan for a floor-by-floor reoccupation of the building as tenants are identified.  Each floor has a net leasable area of approximately 11,500 sq. ft. that can be divided into individual tenant spaces of approximately 500 sq. ft. to 8,000 sq. ft.  The building has a freight elevator and will be equipped with a raised loading dock off of the alley to the north.

AQUAPONICS is a food production system that combines aquaculture–the raising of aquatic animals (fish, shrimp)–with hydroponics–the growing of the plants in water. As the world’s demand for fish protein continues to outpace the supply, aquaculture and aquaponics operations are becoming increasingly popular investments. Aquaponic operations use large, shallow tanks, and Rawleigh’s concrete and steel construction could support these on multiple floors.

WHY TARGET SPACE FOR AQUAPONICS?

  • Aquaponic operations require minimal building improvements beyond basic electrical, heating and cooling systems.  Tanks, pumps and filtration equipment can be quickly installed, and later relocated to other floors or buildings as higher value, longer term uses are attracted to Rawleigh.
  • A large source of non-chlorinated water is required and an existing deep well on the property may provide an ideal raw water source.
  • Locally grown food is in keeping with the Freeport legacy of farming and food production.
  • Urban agriculture systems like aquaponics have the ability to combat food deserts by locating fresh, locally grown foods within the community.  They also provide jobs and training for low-skilled workers.

WHAT COULD THIS PROJECT LOOK LIKE?

  • Growing Power Inc.: With urban farms located in Milwaukee, Chicago, and Madison, Growing Power provides affordable fresh food for people in all communities. This healthy food system initiative spearheaded by CEO Will Allen has multiple farm sites focused on everything from Livestock to vermicompositing. Growing Power’s aquaponics farms grow Yellow Perch and Tilapia, and offer Growing Power workshops in Milwaukee to teach others to do the same.
  • Urban Sustainable Aquaculture (USA), Racine, WI: This aquaculture operation is located in a largely vacant, multi-floor industrial building in downtown Racine. USA specializes in the farming of tilapia and prawns

WHAT’S NEXT?

  • The City is currently seeking short and long term uses for Building B and following a plan for a floor-by-floor reoccupation of the building as tenants are identified.  Each floor has a net useable area of approximately 11,500 sq. ft.